Research & Training

CLASS 2004-2006

Ninad AthaleNinad Athale
I graduated from the University of Virginia where I majored in English and Chemistry, and I have always been very interested in communication.

When I learned about this fellowship opportunity, I was immediately interested. In college, I met a deaf student in a public speaking class, and she became a good friend of mine. I always wanted to learn ASL and this program seemed like a unique opportunity. This fellowship is one of the reasons that I decided to attend UCSD.

Cristina GordonCristina Gordon

I am of Hispanic and French descent and am fluent in both Spanish and French. With regards to my education, I received a B.S. in Biology from California State University, Fullerton in 2004, and I am currently a first-year medical student at the UCSD School of Medicine. I am quite proud to be a student at this institution not only for its outstanding research and primary care reputations, but also because of its outreach to underserved communities, as is evident in the Deaf Culture Training Program. I am definitely eager to learn the language, inspired to discover the culture, and looking forward to being part of the community.

I am of Hispanic and French descent and am fluent in both Spanish and French. With regards to my education, I received a B.S. in Biology from California State University, Fullerton in 2004, and I am currently a first-year medical student at the UCSD School of Medicine. I am quite proud to be a student at this institution not only for its outstanding research and primary care reputations, but also because of its outreach to underserved communities, as is evident in the Deaf Culture Training Program. I am definitely eager to learn the language, inspired to discover the culture, and looking forward to being part of the community.

Lucy HarnLucy Harn
I am very excited to join the ASL program this year because I want to learn more about the Deaf culture and how my knowledge can increase care for Deaf and hard of hearing people in the hospital setting.  I hope that I can become an advocate for the Deaf community in the near future.   I hope you will participate in our research studies!

Quang Tuyen Nguyn Quang Tuyen Nguyn

Currently. I am interested in pursuing a career in pediatrics or immunology although everyday that I learn more about medicine, I realize there are so many incredible fields to focus in. My work with the Deaf Culture program at UCSD has taught me that there is a very rich community that is not adequately served by medicine and I am excited that I might be able to change that in the future, even if it is in only some small way. 

Rosha RamezaniRosha Ramezani
Although I have always known that I wanted to enter the medical field, it was not my freshman year as an undergraduate at UCSD that I learned about the field of public health. I decided I wanted to pursue a combined MD/MPH and eventually work to advocate health not only for individuals but also for entire communities. This program training us in ASL and in providing healthcare for the deaf and hard of hearing is my first step toward advocating health for underserved communities, and it was my main motivation in entering the UCSD School of Medicine.

Shira SchlesingerShira Schlesinger

I'm a first year medical student who got involved with the ASL program out of a desire to serve underserved communities, and a life-long interest in languages. My current research focuses on the need for increased health education sources for lay people in the Deaf community, to assist Deaf individuals in self-advocating with their physician, and gaining more control over their personal health.

I'm a first year medical student who got involved with the ASL program out of a desire to serve underserved communities, and a life-long interest in languages. My current research focuses on the need for increased health education sources for lay people in the Deaf community, to assist Deaf individuals in self-advocating with their physician, and gaining more control over their personal health.

Regina WangRegina Wang
I graduated from UCSD undergraduate in June 2004 as a Biology major and Religion minor. In addition to medical school, I wanted to be a part of the Deaf culture training program because I view language and cultural differences as great barriers for access to healthcare. I am particularly interested in American Sign Language because there are deaf members in my family, so I recognize the bulwarks they face in receiving good healthcare. Because their doctors cannot communicate with them directly, they receive little health education or preventive care. As a result, they suffer the health consequences because there is a language and cultural barrier between them and their healthcare providers.
Lisa Arzamendi
Growing up with diabetes in California's underserved Central Valley has instilled in me an understanding of the trials faced by the disadvantaged in seeking healthcare; and having worked as a Spanish/English medical interpreter both personally (for my grandmother) and professionally (as an emergency room volunteer), I further appreciate the necessity of good cross-cultural understanding, communication, and respect between any patient and doctor. 

Everything I learn about the Deaf community makes me appreciate it even more, and makes me so grateful for the chance to actually personally improve its healthcare.  This program is about bettering our abilities to understand and respond to the Deaf as future physicians, and I am honored to be able to work more closely with everyone, hearing and deaf, involved to this end.